Virat Kohli Dismisses Trump Comparisons With A Dig At Australian Media

Virat Kohli was compared with US President Donald Trump by sections of the Australian media.

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Bollywood and cricket stars came out in support of Virat Kohli after he was compared to Donald Trump.

Virat Kohli’s constant friction with the Australians have taken immense proportions with sections of the Australian press taking up their team’s cause and running almost a campaign against the India skipper as a backdrop to the closely-contested Test series. One of the issues that have really snowballed is Kohli being compared with US President Donald Trump by the Daily Telegraph. This has spurred widespread responses, right from Bollywood to cricketers from both sides.

Kohli himself was contemptuously dismissive of the whole thing, and took a dig at the Australian journalist in question when asked about the issue at Dharamsala, ahead of the crucial 4th Test. He said that so many people were being affected by one individual.

“I have faced this initially in my career and have faced this many times in my career,” Kohli said during the pre-match press briefing, talking about the scrutiny by the foreign media.

“I have always stuck by the right thing, have done the right thing. Always said what I wanted to because I feel it’s right. I have no regrets about it, have nothing to go back and change and the only thing is that so many people are being affected by this one individual. They are selling their news, good luck to them.

“It is something that is happening on the outside and I try and look in the inside, what are the things I improve upon as a cricketer and as a person and what my team mates think about me and what my close ones think about me. These don’t bother me, it never mattered to me,” Kohli said.

The Daily Telegraph had called Kohli ‘the Donald Trump of world sport’, a statement which generated responses from an array of people, ranging from Bollywood superstar Amitabh Bachchan to cricket star Yuvraj Singh.

“Virat Kohli has become the Donald Trump of world sport. Just like President Trump, Kohli decided to blame the media as a means of trying to hide the egg smeared right across his face,” the article in the Daily Telegraph had said.

The acrimony between the Australian team and Kohli had become massive in Bengaluru when the India skipper stopped just short of calling rival skipper Steve Smith a cheat in the now-famous ‘brain fade’ issue.

© NDTV SPORTS

Virat Kohli Alleges Australians ‘Disrespected’ Indian Team Physio

While saving a run on the first day of the third Test, Virat Kohli hurt his shoulder and Farhart rushed onto the field to attain to his injury. Kohli eventually left the field with the physio.

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Virat Kohli injured his shoulder while fielding during Australia’s first innings.

Allegations and denials flew thick and fast between rival captains Virat Kohli and Steven Smith with the India skipper alleging that his team’s physio Patrick Farhart was “disrespected” by Australians during the 3rd Test in Ranchi. Kohli said that some Australians unnecessarily taunted Farhart but Smith rubbished the claim.

“They (four-five of them) started taking Patrick’s name. I don’t know why. He’s our physio. His job is to treat me. I don’t find the reason behind it. I could not understand. You must ask why they have started taking his name,” said Kohli after the Ranchi Test ended in a draw.

While saving a run on the first day of the third Test, Kohli hurt his shoulder and Farhart rushed onto the field to attain to his injury. Kohli eventually left the field with the physio.

Later Glenn Maxwell was seen mocking Kohli’s injury when he imitated his action by clutching his right shoulder after his dive to save a boundary. The Indian skipper, too, gave it back with a similar gesture when David Warner got out on Day 4.

When an Australian scribe asked about the mocking incident involving himself and Glenn Maxwell, an upset Kohli said: “It’s funny all our guys ask about cricket as the first thing and you ask about something controversial. But it’s okay. These things happen on the field.”

However Smith insisted that they never disrespected Farhart, who himself is an Australia.

“It was a bit disappointing. I didn’t actually do anything. Virat was having a go at me saying I was disrespecting Patrick Farhart. It was probably the exact opposite.

“I think he probably did a pretty terrific job to be able to get Virat back on the field after that shoulder injury. He’s a terrific physio and he obviously does a great job for them,” said Smith.

Asked about his take on the spirit of the game, Smith said: “There’s always a bit of tension when you’re playing India in Test matches. As far I’m concerned it’s being played in the right spirit on the field and it’s a hard and tough grind. That’s how I would explain it and no issues with that.”

© NDTV SPORTS

Captaincy Does Not Allow You To Be Complacent, Says Virat Kohli

Virat Kohli maintained that captain was only as good as his team, refusing a verdict on his leadership.

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Virat Kohli said when you are leader of the side batting becomes a more serious job.

Virat Kohli on Wednesday said it was too early to pass a judgment on his captaincy but insisted he has become a better batsman after assuming the leadership role since captaincy does not leave any room for complacency. Kohli maintained that captain was only as good as his team, refusing a verdict on his leadership.

“I don’t judge myself after every series. Priority and the only goal that we have is to win games of cricket. Captaincy will be as good as how your team performs and how consistent the players are. If we are not playing to our potential as players, there’s not much I can do as captain.

“The more the team becomes mature, the captain starts looking good. If the team doesn’t do well, the captaincy bit seems out of control,” Kohli said on the eve of series-opener against Australia.

“Maybe five to eight years down the line I will be able to judge myself as a captain if I remain captain for that long. I feel personally it’s too early for me to sit down and judge what I have done well or haven’t,” he said.

Kohli, who has enjoyed a phenomenal run in recent past both as a batsman and captain, said when you are leader of the side, batting becomes a more serious job.

“Captaincy does not allow you to be complacent at any stage especially with the bat if that is your only discipline in the game, in the field as well. In that aspect I think complacency goes out the window as captain,” Kohli said on the eve of the series-opener against Australia.

“You tend to focus a lot more on certain situations which you might or might not without the extra responsibility on your shoulders and may play a loose shot.”

Kohli said it hold true for his Australian counterpart Steve Smith as well.

“Captaincy requires you to be on point throughout the game that’s one thing which has worked well for me and I think Steve Smith as well. He has been performing consistently with the bat and as captain as well. It’s the same scenario there as well. Captain’s responsibility has urged him to focus a bit more in certain situations and push that much extra for his team and that has shown in his performances.

“He is the no. 1 Test player in the world and there’s a reason for that. I can’t pinpoint any similarities in our career. I have seen him in the academy he was never a dominant batsman and it’s a remarkable achievement for someone starting his career as a leg-spinner.”

The young Indian batsman said he hardly thinks about others’ opinion about him even as he is quite comfortable in his skin now.

“I am pretty confident of where my game stands and pretty comfortable with myself as a person now. People writing articles or speaking about certain things, that’s their job. I have no control over it, they have to write or criticise or not criticise, that’s not in my control.

“I focus on my game and that’s the priority for me,” he said when asked about how he handled the pressure of being in the spotlight all the time.

The Indian team is approaching the four-Test series against Australia with a more settled frame of mind than against England, said Kohli.

“We come into the series much more confident and surer about us as a squad and what we want to do. Every match and series is challenging and we don’t see any series as high or low. All teams we had played were good quality teams. Australia is no different.

“England was a very tough series. We started off (home season) with a draw which we managed and which was not a convincing draw from our side. It was more of not letting the opposition win and from there on we turned things around.

“That took a lot of character and the team is in a different mind, space ever since that first game in Rajkot. The mindset has been different,” said Kohli.

The 28-year-old Delhi stalwart once again emphasised that his team members do not focus on the opposition but on their own strengths.

“We don’t need to focus too much on the opposition, at the same time we respect them. Last game we respected Bangladesh equally. Every opposition has to be respected on equal terms. We are not worried about the opposition’s combinations or what they want to come up with. We are pretty comfortable with what we want to do. That’s our strength, not focusing on opposition too much.”

He expected the track prepared for the game at the Maharashtra Cricket Association’s stadium as dry.

“Even in the one-day games that we have played here, the surface was dry underneath. It had a decent covering of grass which you need to keep for the surface to hold itself together. This time of the year when the summer comes in the wicket tends to get slower and lower. So that’s what we expect from this wicket as well.

“We expect it to turn from day two, day three. It’s very difficult to keep the wicket together. We understand exactly how the wicket’s going to play.”

He said the Indian pace bowlers were now comfortable with a more restrictive role they have been given to play.

“The pacers have stood out. People who have standout performances are the ones in the limelight but guys who have important contributions, especially with the ball, are the ones that take those important one or two wickets in between the innings to give the spinners a bit of rest and then come back and attack again. The pace bowlers have been able to do that.

“One reason for that is they are very comfortable in the roles they have been given. To run in hot conditions and not necessarily having the plan to attack all the time can be difficult. And that’s one reason for our success as well. People are playing selfless cricket and the fast bowlers have been the prime contenders for that.

“The way they have stood out during the England series and against Bangladesh as well. Just now in Hyderabad, Umesh, Bhuvi, Ishant all three of them. Even against New Zealand they came up with important contributions throughout the series. So it’s been a massive, massive factor for us in winning those series.”

He described Mitchell Starc, the Aussie pace spearhead, as a world class bowler.

“He has been hampered by injuries quite often, but the way he has evolved as a bowler, it’s been outstanding. I have played with him in IPL, I have faced him in my first tour to Australia. From then to now it’s a massive change. “He has learnt the art of reverse swing and bowling with the old ball as well is amazing to see, the way he has developed his skills. That’s something that every cricketer in the world would admire. He has really taken his game to the next level and that’s why he is counted among the top bowlers in world cricket and deserves to be there.”

Kohli said he understands the reason for the visitors to have brought so many slow bowlers.

“I am not surprised (with the side including four spin bowlers), coming to India playing in summers. Wickets are meant to be dry and they are meant to turn. You will have a stronger spin bowling attack then getting six seven fast bowlers. That is a pretty natural selection,” he said.

© THE INDIAN EXPRESS