Virat Kohli To Meet CoA Over Pay Structure

Virat Kohli to meet the CoA before the IPL final in Hyderabad on May 21.

virat-sachin

NEW DELHI: Indian captain Virat Kohli is likely to take up the issue of hikes and payment structure of players when he meets the Committee of Administrators (CoA) before the IPL final in Hyderabad on May 21. It is learnt that senior cricketers, who had earlier told CoA that the current payment structure was unscientific and needed to be rectified, would discuss the payment structure. The cricketers would also take up the issue of non-payment of fees and other compensation which has been pending for months.

Sources have indicated that the mood is that players would not be willing for settle for less than what they are negotiating for. With their Australian counterparts making something to the tune of Rs 7 to 10 crore and even bargaining for more, the Indian players are keen that they too get something at par with the Aussies. Sources said that the Grade A players, who are paid around Rs 2 crore retainership fees, could be looking at more than Rs 7 crore especially for those who are playing in all the three formats for the country.

Indian cricketers get Rs 15 lakh per Test, Rs 6 lakh per ODI and Rs 3 lakh for T20I and a player of Kohli’s stature makes more than Rs 5 crore.

The main issue that could emerge is that players, who are not in Tests but only playing limited-overs cricket, should be paid under one basket and those who are only in Tests and not playing the shorter formats would get another set of retainership fees. Sources said that those who are playing in both the formats would be eligible for payment under both the retainership fees. If the players get a hike, they are also entitled to get separate match fees.

It was also understood that current management of the board is on the same page with the players, but they may not agree to such a big hike without understanding the whole dynamics of the payment to other domestic and junior levels. Even the board isn’t aware of any particular figure which the cricketers are looking at. Sources said that the CoA may be willing to keep the Grade A system for Test and shorter formats separate and ensure that a cricketer like Cheteshwar Pujara is duly compensated because of not playing IPL and shorter formats for India.

Furthermore, there is also a thought process that the Test retainership should be higher than the shorter formats. It would be interesting to see if the cricketers agree to it. “At the end of his career, Pujara shouldn’t feel that he hasn’t earned enough after playing Test cricket when an IPL contract could see an up coming domestic cricketer making more than him. There has to be a balance,” the board functionary said.

 Kumble too will meet CoA

Sources said that Indian coach Anil Kumble, who gave an exhaustive report on how the cricketers should be paid, is also going to meet CoA on May 21. However, he is supposed to meet the board functionary separately as per the agenda. The CoA, who is responsible for renewing all big contracts, is expected to discuss his financial terms as his contract with BCCI ends after the Champions Trophy.

 The top functionaries are keen that Kumble would continue after the ICC event and he can’t be penalised for expressing his view on Indian participation in the Champions Trophy when BCCI was at loggerheads with ICC.

© THE TIMES OF INDIA

 

Virat Kohli Reveals Long Term Ambition: Wanted To Be One Of The Top Players In The World

Virat Kohli received the Polly Umrigar for a record third time in his career at the BCCI annual awards ceremony being held in Bengaluru on Wednesday.

25321

India captain Virat Kohli was honoured with the Polly Umrigar award at the Board of Control for Cricket in India annual awards ceremony on Wednesday. Kohli is the only Indian cricketer to receive this award three times.

Kohli, upon receiving the award from former India wicket-keeper Farokh Engineer, thanked his teammates and acknowledged 2016 as the breakthrough year in his career.

“It’s been quite unbelievable, the last 10-12 months. As cricketers you always have a breakthrough year. Starting later 2015 to end of last year probably I could recall, you know, when I get older as the breakthrough year in my career. All the hard-work, all the training, on a daily basis all the sacrifices I think came together nicely,” Kohli said at the glittering awards ceremony which was held in Bengaluru.

“Couldn’t have been possible without the help of my teammates. At times when you don’t do well is when champion players in your side step up. Everyone has been able to do that and that’s why we are the top side in the world. Its testimony to the kind of talent we have in the team. I thank all my teammates for the support, the trust and the effort. It’s a great honour receiving this for the third time,” he added.

The ceremony was conducted by former India all-rounder and Team Director Ravi Shastri, who also asked Kohli on what triggered off the spark in him that took his game to a different level.

“I always wanted to be one of the top players in the world so I understood what it would take for me to maintain my form in all three formats. Its very important in the transitional phase to be available for all three formats. The kind of position the BCCI has put me in I’m very thankful of. I take it as an opportunity, I don’t take this as a job. I’ve been put in a place that I need to do the right things, set the right examples and follow a certain path that the whole team believes in.

“My early days in my career as well there have been people who doubted the way I’ve gone about with my game. Even now there are doubters and haters all around. But one thing is for sure that I’ve always believed in myself, always believed in my heart that if I work hard 120% everyday of my life then I won’t be answerable to anyone,” Kohli said.

The 28-year-old was on a roll last year amassing 1215 runs in 12 Tests at an average of over 75 including a record four double hundreds in consecutive series. He scored 739 runs in 10 ODIs at 92.37 with three hundreds and slammed 641 runs in 15 Twenty20 internationals at 106.83 with seven half-centuries to his name. He is the only batsman in the world who averages over 50 in all three formats of the game.

© Rohan Sen, indiatoday.in

I Don’t Get Satisfied After Getting A Hundred: Virat Kohli

From preparation to execution, captain Virat Kohli puts into perspective his record-breaking run.

24706

Australia are yet to arrive in India for their upcoming high profile four-match Test series, but they have already confessed they don’t have any plans to contain Virat Kohli. It is the feeling that West Indies went through in Antigua, New Zealand in Indore, England in Mumbai and Bangladesh in Hyderabad. In four consecutive Test series, the Indian captain has got four double hundreds. He has eclipsed Sir Don Bradman and former India Captain and current India A and U-19 coach Rahul Dravid, who scored double tons in three consecutive Test series.

In the lead up to the Test against Bangladesh, Virat did not immerse himself in the nets. Change in formats do not matter to him. He even opened in the recently concluded T20Is against England, but when he is back in the whites, his aggressive intent takes a different form. En route to his double hundred, he had three partnerships and he was the dominant force in all three. At the same time, also collected 108 running runs. He got his first fifty in 70 balls, the second in 60 and his third fifty in only 40 balls to reach the 150-run mark. There was no big hit, no six. In fact, in this home season in Tests, he has hit just a solitary six.

When width was provided or a short ball bowled, he made full use, yet 67 per cent of his runs were in front of the wicket. Of the 127 runs he scored against the spinners, the shot that got him his double was his first lofted one. It is a model based on traditional scoring methods, insane fitness levels, mental superiority, the desire to outperform himself and an insatiable hunger for excellence.

After his record-breaking double ton, the Indian captain spoke to BCCI.TV and explained how the added responsibility brings out the best in him.

It started off from Antigua and you now have a double hundred in every series. You’ve even surpassed Sir Don Bradman and Rahul Dravid.

I think it is because of captaincy that you tend to go on more than you would as a batsman. I think there is no room for complacency when you become the captain. I have always wanted to play long innings. My first seven-eight (seven) hundreds were not even 120 plus scores and after that I made a conscious effort to bat long. (I) Controlled my excitement and worked on not getting complacent at any stage. I have worked on those things and have worked on my fitness over the years. I feel like I can go on for longer periods. I don’t get tired as much as I used to before. I definitely don’t get satisfied when I get a Test hundred which was the case before because I used to give too much importance to Test cricket separately. Now, I have just started to treat it as any (other) game of cricket and I have to keep going on till the time my team needs me to.

You opened the batting recently in T20Is. Despite the change in format from white ball to red ball, you are able to bat the way just like the way you want to. How do you manage to do that?

It is not an easy thing to do with the amount of cricket we play nowadays. It is more of a mental thing. I don’t necessarily focus too much on practice. Sometimes, you don’t get to practice too much, but mentally you need to focus and think about what you are going to do in the game. Switching to different formats is the need of the hour and I want to contribute in all three formats. It has always been my mindset. I have to prepare a certain way. It is more mental than getting into the nets. I think about the game a lot.

It surely must not be as easy to bat for so long and get a big score as you made it look like here in Hyderabad?

The wicket was really good to bat on to be honest. It wasn’t as testing as other wickets that I scored centuries on. To get a double hundred you need to bat for a long period and you need to do things right to get to that score. The focus was only to follow my intent and at the same time, be careful about choosing my shots. Luckily, I struck the right balance in this particular innings and it feels good to have got a big score.

You were spot on with your first review. What made you not opt for the second one?

If the ball has spun from right under my eyes when I am batting on 180, it has to spin a lot for me to miss it as I had been connecting all. It wasn’t a lapse in concentration. The ball really spun sharply from the front of my pad. We had two reviews left. If I got out, I would’ve been the fifth batsman to get out and others could still use the one review left.

For the other, I thought I was plumb in front. I was falling back when I got hit on the pad as well and that’s why the umpire could not give not out either. I wasn’t standing there, I was falling behind. If you look at the real-time replay it looks plumb. The umpires don’t have a replay and so do the players. I didn’t want to use a review that I felt like I was plumb in front because a Saha, Jadeja or Ashwin could be nearing a milestone and they could use it for themselves as well. The second one to me felt like I was plumb and that’s why I started walking briskly as well. No grudges with the umpire either as it happened way too quickly for them to understand where it actually impacted the pads.

© Moulin Parikh, BCCI

I Got A MS Dhoni Signed Ball As Memorabilia: Virat Kohli

Team India captain reflects on the series win, the findings and a memorabilia to cherish.

24381

The common thread between geniuses is that they don’t consider their performance as an art. For them it is an outing to display character, class and consistency. The pundits can be in awe of what is at display, but for the genius it is the flow engineered by the state of mind.

Virat Kohli is one such genius in the making who shows a gung-ho attitude on the field and his youthful exuberance is something that would make you fall in love with the art of batting.

The teenager who led the India U-19 team to victory in 2008 is now the Indian Captain across all formats of the game, albeit one thing remaining constant – his hunger to win games.

2016 was one such year for Virat as he led the team in whites and made India reclaim the No.1 Test rankings. His growing maturity and show with the willow had impressed all and sundry and therefore he was recently handed over the reins of limited overs captaincy by MS Dhoni with India-England ODI series being his first assignment as India’s full-time captain.

India won the series 2-1 and the skipper spoke to BCCI TV on his ability to walk the talk, findings from the series and more..

Excerpts:

Captain, you once famously said that ‘we can’t always give excuses on transition and learning, it is time for results’. You have walked the talk and how.

Yes, it has been a series of finds, character building, people expressing themselves and not worrying about the number of games they have played. The team has showed character and intent of being smart cricketers, winning games for the country. There is no better feeling and I feel that the guys have really encashed the opportunity wonderfully and delivered every time we have been under the pump. Especially youngsters stepping up with special mentions to Kedar Jadhav and Hardik Pandya, the way they have performed in the series has been outstanding. Everyone has contributed throughout the series and that’s the hallmark of a good team.

Cricket pundits are raving about this one SIX of yours against Chris Woakes in the 1st ODI. How did you make it happen?

I don’t know (laughs). I think it was the momentum that I was in and the motivation to win a game for my country, understanding how many runs we need from the number of balls left and reacting to the ball coming in that area. I have never played a shot like that before, but to have executed that, I surprised myself as well. It is one of those shots that will remain as a memory in your career and you can sit back and say that this is one of those special things that happened to me. I’m grateful to have executed it.


Phrases like ‘King Kohli’ and ‘Captain Fearless’ have been doing the rounds everywhere. What do you think suits the best to you?

I prefer being the Joker in the change room.

Three moments from the ODI series that will stay with you for long and why?

Kedar’s batting performance in the 1st ODI.

Yuvi (Yuvraj Singh) and MS (Dhoni), the way they batted in the second game and the way Bhuvi (Bhuvneshwar Kumar) bowled in the death overs

The way Hardik and Kedar strung in the partnership (3rd ODI). I think it is commendable for two guys after having lost all the experienced guys in the team to stitch a partnership like this on a difficult wicket is something outstanding for me. These three events stand out for me because this is something that we always wish as a team to execute.

Most Captains have a ritual of picking up memorabilia after a series win. Have you picked up anything yet?

Well, MS gave me the match ball in the second game. The stumps are too expensive nowadays and they don’t allow us to take it home (smiles). He gave me the ball and told me that it was my first series win as captain and it is memorable. It was a special moment for me and I got the ball signed from him as well.

© BCCI